Easy Gingerbread Cake

Front on angled shot of a cut gingerbread cake, with glaze and crystalized ginger pieces on top.
Gingerbread cake takes me back to my childhood, & a truly simple cake to prepare, I had to include in the Sweet Lessons.  Made with Golden Syrup, Black Treacle & ginger, (of course), this is one of our popular & classic British cakes.

Sweet Lesson 3

Easy Gingerbread Cake

By Caro


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Recipe in grams, ounces & cup measurements, as well as where to buy the Golden Syrup & Black Treacle if you are not in the UK.

*Original recipe 7/10/2018, photos updated & recipe card added 22/11/2022

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Close overhead sho of gingerbread cake with white glaze drizzled thickly on top and with tiny crytallised ginger pieces.
Memories of Gingerbread In Britain

Growing up, I remember eating Jamaican Ginger Bread.  I had some shop bought recently but it wasn’t the brand I remember as a child, so it just didn’t taste as good or have that nice soft almost ‘crust’ like edge to it.  Then a friend’s mum was making some for a charity fundraiser & I luckily got to taste some (her & her family are regular taste testers of my bakes). It was so good, I wanted to try it for myself & add it to the website.  (She couldn’t remember where the recipe had originated from, but she had tweaked it over the years).  

‘How Is British Gingerbread Cake Different?’

Although it is named gingerbread cake, British gingerbread cake doesn’t have a very strong ginger taste.  It’s hard to describe it & it’s because of the also unique taste of the Black treacle & Golden Syrup that is used in the batter.   



Black Treacle, Golden Syrup & Corn Syrup Debate

“Is Black Treacle Same As Dark Corn Syrup (Dark Karo)?”

Now I see debates about what Black Treacle is like on Facebook groups, people saying it is the same as molasses & dark corn starch (dark Karo).  Black Treacle is definitely not the same as dark corn starch.  It’s closest is probably black strap molasses.  However, there is no guarantee they will taste the same or have the same over-all effect on the baked cake.  

If I ever get some of that molasses sent over from the states, I will taste and do a test.  In the meantime, some internet sites selling British products have this in stock and those that do often have the golden syrup.  Yes, another British product.


Pouring black treacle on top of pot of golden syrup.

(Photo of Golden Syrup & Black Treacle).

“Is Golden Syrup Same As Light Corn Syrup (Karo)?”

No, Golden Syrup is not the same as Corn Syrup or Karo Light Corn Syrup. Not the same colour, consistency, taste, or how it is made.

 **Below is a list I compiled from readers in the States & Canada, of where to buy Black Treacle & Golden Syrup.


Golden Syrup in plastic bottle & Black Treacle in a red tin with spoons dripping above.
WHERE TO BUY GOLDEN SYRUP & BLACK TREACLE

These are both widely available in the UK and even shops like Aldi sell their own version of the syrup. But for bakers in the US & Canada, here is a list of where you can source these:

World Market, some Walmarts in Canada, Sobys, ‘Stop & Shop’, Wegmans, Frys (Smiths), Woodmans, Nugget Store, The Scottish Bakery, The British Store, Talin Market, Albertsons & in Dorgnacs.  It is also available online at Amazon (free delivery for Prime accounts), 647-Florist.com, British Food Depot.com, UK Gourmet.us, World Market.com, Cost Plus World Market & Marina Market.

(Information current at October 2019).  


overhead angled shot of a dinner table with gingerbread cake and slice served all on white tablewear.

Now I am also told, that you can get both the Golden Syrup & Black Treacle from:  Nugget Store & online from: Marina Market, UK Gourmet, British Food Depot & Amazon.  So if possible, try to get both.  The Golden Syrup can even be used as is on top of desserts and cakes so won’t go to waste.

**You also don’t need to get the brand Tate & Lyle for the Golden Syrup (this brand however is a deeper colour).


WHY THESE INGREDIENTS ARE BEST

Apart from being the original ingredients intended for the recipe when it was designed, a friend from the Facebook GBBO Fans conducted a little experiment and halved the recipe. She baked half with the Golden Syrup & Black Treacle, and the other cake with US Grandma’s Molasses & Karo Dark Corn Syrup. Not only was the taste different, but the colour and more surprisingly the texture was different too. Here are Jennifer’s results in her own words:

The Evidence

Comparison Of US Vs UK Ingredients For Caro’s Gingerbread Cake

4 photo collage by Jennifer testing using different US ingredients to Golden syrup and Black treackle and showing difference in colour and texture of the cake.

I used Karo Dark Corn Syrup in place of Golden Syrup and Molasses in place of Black Treacle in the US version.

Golden Syrup taste is just incomparable to anything I’ve ever had in the US products. It’s very similar to butterscotch, but not as heavy. Corn Syrup just does not compare at all.

Black treacle tastes very like the Sorghum Blackstrap Molasses that my Grandfather used to love. I couldn’t get any of that, but I believe it would be a good substitute.

On oven exit, the UK cake seemed fluffier than the US one. US is much lighter in colour, and lacks the strong flavor of the UK ingredients. It’s still very good, but I would recommend purchasing UK ingredients if at all possible. The taste is just that much better.

As always with Caro’s recipes, I highly recommend. “

Jennifer Jones

FACEBOOK, OCTOBER 2020.

Extra extra close shot of top of a gingerbread cake with icing and pieces of crystallised stem ginger.

Other than that, this recipe is really simple with nothing technical to it.  It makes one loaf size cake, but you could make in other cake tins too.

You can leave undecorated, or add a simple glaze of icing/powdered sugar, and add some chopped crystallised stem ginger if you like.

 

Cake Tin Used

I used a 22 x 11cm x 6.5cm deep 2lb bread tin (8.5 x 4.3 inches x 2.3 inches deep).


Photo of the ingredients for gingerbread and labelled.

Ingredient List

As well as the Golden Syrup & Black Treacle, what else is in this British Gingerbread cake?

This gingerbread cake recipe was originally written using UK Self-raising flour, but I have subsequently tested it using Plain (All Purpose) flour and have listed below how much baking powder you will need if using this flour.  

Gingerbread cake also has eggs, unsalted butter, milk, light brown sugar, ground cinnamon & ginger and finally bicarbonate of soda (Baking Soda).

Any milk is fine and dark brown sugar or coconut sugar would also work.

Have undecorated, or add a simple glaze of icing/powdered sugar, & add some chopped crystallised stem ginger if you like.


VARIATIONS ON THE RECIPE

Mini Gingerbread Bundt Cakes

Try my slight variation on this gingerbread recipe to make mini gingerbread bundt cakes. Using half the batter, tweaking this recipe to make a slightly firmer texture, & applying cooking/baking spray, this recipe works well for keeping the details in silicone bundts. (For metal cake pans I recommend lining paste ). The video below is for making the mini gingerbread bundts.


Gingerbread Cakelets

The beautiful photos below are by reader Diana Watkins. Diana used a Nordic Ware snowflake cakelets pan, greased with Homemade Lining Paste (Cake Goop) & used my Mini Gingerbread Bundt Cakes recipe (see above), for some festive holiday mini cakes! They look just perfect, with the glaze detailing on top. Great job Diana!


DOWNLOAD the recipe lesson – save onto your phone or computer for using or printing off later.

Experienced bakers – skip to the abbreviated Recipe Card –

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Overhead shot of table of gingerbread cake ingredients labelled.

INGREDIENTS

  • 113g  Butter, unsalted
  • (4 oz, 1 stick or 1/2 cup)
  • 150g  Golden Syrup
  • ( 5.25 oz or 1/3 cup)
  • 75g  Black Treacle (see note above)
  • (2.5 oz, 1/4 cup or 3 3/4 tbsp)
  • 113g  Light Brown Sugar
  • (4 oz or 1/2 cup)
  • 1 tsp tsp Ground Ginger
  • 3/8 tsp Ground Cinnamon
  • 188ml  Milk
  • (1 fl oz or  3/4 cup)
  • 2 Medium – Large  Eggs (Large-XLarge US)
  • 3/8 tsp Bicarbonate of Soda (Baking Soda)
  • 225g  Self-raising Flour (8 oz) (see note above)
  • OR  1  3/4 cup Plain/All Purpose plus  2 3/4 tsp Baking Powder (be sure to also add the 3/8 tsp above too, so that would make a total of 3 1/8 tsp)

For Icing/Glaze (optional)

  • 125g  Icing/Powdered or Confectioners’ Sugar, sieved (4.5 oz or 1 cup)
  • Few tsp Water or milk
  • Crystallised Stem Ginger Pieces, chopped (optional)

Overhead shot of a white glazed large gingerbread cake on a whit eplatter, on a white table for serving.

EQUIPMENT

  • Scales or measuring cups
  • Measuring spoons
  • Small measuring jug
  • Small cooking pot
  • Medium – Large mixing bowl
  • Hand Whisk
  • Baking/parchment paper or loaf tin liners
  • Spray oil, (Frylight), Cake release spray or butter for greasing (For metal tins use homemade lining paste – see instructions).
  • Loaf tin (I used a 21.5 x 10cm / 8.5 x 4 in, see note above)
  • Sieve
  • Medium bowl x 2
  • Metal spoon
  • Timer or phone timer
  • Cooling rack

OVEN: 180c/160c Fan Oven/350f/Gas Mark 4


INSTRUCTIONS

4 photo collage of greasing spoon for syrup and treacle, adding to butter and fater heating - photo 1.

1. Place the butter, golden syrup, black treacle, sugar, cinnamon & ginger in a small saucepan and warm on medium heat until everything is dissolved and melted.

** Tip for using the syrup & treacle – spray oil on the measuring spoon and it will slip off easier. See Photo 1.  I use & recommend Frylight cooking spray (full disclosure – no sponsorship or payment from Frylight). I also use on silicone bakeware, especially silicone mini bundt cake cases (see it used for my mini gingerbread bundt cakes recipe, or in the video above). I also use it for greasing cake & bread tins/pans, when not using homemade Lining Paste. Less expensive than cake release spray or butter & flour. Don’t buy from the bigger supermarkets, but pay less by purchasing from the likes of Aldi, Lidl, B&M or Home Bargains.

Once the ingredients are melted & dissolved, mix everything thoroughly and remove from the heat.  See Photo1.  Allow to cool while you prepare all the other ingredients & the cake tin.  (This is because we don’t want it too hot when adding to the eggs, or it might scramble them.)  


4 photo collage of greasing and paper lining a rectangular bread loaf tin - photo 2.

2. Grease & line your cake/bread tin with some baking/parchment paper. You can buy paper liners for loaf tins, but I just cut out my own.  Here is how to use less paper, & for it to fit better in the tin (Not doing so, can result in the paper can ending up baked into the cake at the corners).

Place the paper under the tin & cut out a cross shape, (like in Photo 2), ensuring the paper is long enough to go up the sides & for just a little excess.  I cut in angled lines, so there is little or no over-lap once positioned inside the tin.  Then simply grease or oil the tin well and place the paper in position.  See Photo 2. You can also draw lines for where to cut out, and then simply turn the paper over when placing in the tin. Add more oil if needed & only grease shortly before adding in your batter.

For metal tins, I also recommend making your own lining paste. Also known as Cake Goop, it is less expensive that cake release spray, or using butter and flour. Can be used for any greasing in your baking or cooking & even made gluten free. Read my review of lining paste and how to make it at home.


2 photo collage of whisking egg and adding milk - photo 3.

3. Heat the oven to 180c/160c Fan Oven/350f/Gas Mark 4.

4. Place the egg in a medium sized mixing bowl & whisk lightly.  This ‘wakes up’ or activates the protein in the egg & helps provide structure for the cake. Add in the milk & bicarbonate of soda (baking soda) and whisk till all combined.  See Photo 3.  


2 photo collage of wet ingredients before mixing together - photo 4.

5.  Next add the cooled syrup mixture to this milky-egg mixture, and stir continually until all incorporated.  See Photo 4.


2 photo collage of sieving flour and adding to wet ingredients for gingerbread cake - photo 5.

6. Finally sieve over the flour (and baking powder if using Plain/All Purpose Flour instead of UK Self-raising), into the mixture. Beat until combined and the batter is smooth. (A few small lumps is fine and you can use a hand-held or stand mixer for this if you like).   Note that this batter will be thin and runny in comparison to some other cake batters.  See Photos 5 & 6.


2 photo collage of gingerbread cake batter half way up a lined bread tin & then full once baked - photo 6.

7. Carefully pour the gingerbread cake batter into the prepared cake/bread tin, and then give a few gentle taps of the tin on the counter/worktop to expel any trapped air. See Photo 6.

8. Bake in the centre of the pre-heated oven, for about 25 minutes, until a deep golden colour, set and when you insert a wooden cocktail stick into the centre of the cake, it comes out clean of crumbs.  Note if colouring too soon, cover the top of the cake in foil till cooked through.  (Don’t cover at the beginning of baking as the foil will stick to the cake as it rises, so best to check & cover if needed, at some point after 15 minutes of baking.) It will be very soft on top.  


Overhead shot of a gingerbread cake baked in a lined bread tin on top of a cooling wrack - photo 7.

9. Leave to cool in the cake tin for about 10 minutes, before transferring, paper and all, to a cooling rack.

Alternatively, you can leave in the tin for longer or overnight if not decorating or eating same day, provided you have greased and lined your tin. Leave out at room temperature to cool completely, before wrapping in cling film/plastic wrap. Leave out at room temperature and not the fridge, as condensation will occur and wet the cake. 

Make The Icing/Glaze

10. While the cake is cooling, make up your icing/glaze if you want some, (believe me it’s nice without it too).  Begin by sieving the icing/powdered sugar into a medium sized bowl, (otherwise you will get the sugar everywhere). See Photo 8.


2 photo collage of pwodered sugar in a bowl with drops of water and mixed to a paste - photo 8.

11. Add 1 tsp of water (or you can use milk), & mix with a spoon.  Once the water is in, use the back of a large spoon to push down on the sugar that will keep absorbing the liquid.  Keep doing so – you will be amazed at how much liquid this sugar can absorb if you keep at it. Then gradually add in a 1/2 tsp of water at a time & the sugar will become paste like. (See Photo 8 & 9).  Keep rubbing in, & adding 1/8 tsp drop at a time, until you get a thick but pourable icing/glaze.

Thick is best as it will form a nice layer and not ‘melt’ into the cake.


2 photo collage of powdered sugar and little water to paste and then thick but pouring off a spoon nicely - photo 9.

To test if it’s right, hold your spoon up high above the bowl with some icing/glaze on it & point it downwards to let it drip off. (You can also test on the bottom of a small upside-down bowl).  You want it to run down gently. (See Photo 9). If it stays where it is, add more water a tiny drop at a time. If you have added too much water at once, sieve in more sugar and repeat until you get it right.  Very, very gradually is the key here. Watch my quick video showing how the glaze will fall.

If you want to make using a mixer, start by adding in 1 1/2 tsp & again very gradually adding more drops in.

12. Leave the cake on the paper you used to bake with, still on top of the cooling rack, with some more paper underneath, to catch any drips of the glaze. (See Photo 10 below). Alternatively, you can transfer the cake to a platter with some paper underneath, that you can remove once the glazed cake is set.


2 photo collage of spoon of glaze above a gingerbread cake and after drizzling glaze on top, when on a cooling rack over parchment paper - photo 10.

13. Once the cake is cooled down, take a spoon’s worth of the icing/glaze & hold high above the cake.  I like to start at the end/edge of the cake and draw it across the cake as the sugar drips down. Holding up high gives you a thinner drizzle.  

Just move your hand left & right while drizzling above the cake and do any pattern or random drizzle that you like. See Photo 10 where I started with some thicker lines and then added some thinner ones in-between until I used up all the glaze.


Close angled shot of a gingerbread loaf cake with white glaze drizzled on top and showing cut crystallised stem ginger pieces for decoration - photo 11..

Alternatively, you can pour the glaze over the cake, or keep the glaze slightly thick & spread it on, starting from the middle with a thick amount and then spreading out to the edges. It should set up in minutes if the room isn’t too war, so you might need to work quick if spreading on. Having the paper still under the cake comes in handy for the drips of the glaze!

14.  Add some chopped crystalized ginger if you like & let the glaze set (dry to touch).  See Photo 11.    Now go ahead and slice the cake with a large serrated knife, very gently (hold the cake if you can at the sides, as the crumb is very soft and delicate).  Serve as is & enjoy!


Photo of using a large serrated bread knife to cut glazed gingerbread cake.
Storing & Freezing

15.  Store in an airtight container or cake stand & dome, for at least a few days.  (I recommend cake tins for most of your baked goods).

Can easily be frozen too. Just include some kitchen paper/paper towel in with it, so that this absorbs any moisture when defrosting, and wrap in baking/parchment paper, before some cling film/plastic wrap or a food bag. Date and label the bag – should be good for a few months. Thaw at room temperature. Can be frozen with or without glaze.

Share The Love

Please see the sharing options or even printing, at the right/bottom of your screen (bottom of your screen for mobile devices, & down the right-hand side on computers). You can even pin this to your own Pinterest page. Alternatively, you can download this article, see below. You could also leave some feedback if you like.


Mini gingerbread bundt cake close up served, and with a very light glaze drizzled on top, with holly shaped and gingerbread men 3d sprinkles.

DOWNLOAD the recipe lesson – save onto your phone or computer for using or printing off later.


MINI GINGERBREAD BUNDT CAKES

I also have a slightly altered version for Mini Gingerbread Bundt Cakes, that are ideal for the holidays and gifting. That same altered recipe can be used to make Gingerbread Cakelets


DIFFICULTY LEVEL: Super Easy, Beginner.

Rating: 1 out of 5.

Next Step

BAKING LESSONS STUDENTS proceed to Theory Lesson 6 – Importance Of Sieving In Baking.


Recipe Card For Easy British Gingerbread Cake

Front on angled shot of a cut gingerbread cake, with glaze and crystalized ginger pieces on top.
Print

Easy British Gingerbread Cake – Sweet Lesson 3

Gingerbread cake is a childhood favourite, & a truly simple cake to prepare, I had to include in the Sweet Lessons. Made with Golden Syrup, Black Treacle & ginger, (of course), this is one of our popular & classic British cakes. **Note you can print this recipe card with/without photos or notes.
Course Dessert, Snack, Sweet
Cuisine British
Keyword Cake, Christmas, Christmas Gift, Ginger
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 25 minutes
Cooling Time 35 minutes
Total Time 1 hour 30 minutes
Servings 12 Slices
Author Caro
SAVE RECIPE Share on Facebook

Equipment

  • Scales or measuring cups
  • Measuring Spoons
  • Small measuring jug
  • Small Cooking Pot
  • Medium – Large mixing bowl
  • Hand Whisk
  • Baking/parchment paper or loaf tin liners
  • Spray oil, Cake release spray or butter for greasing (For this cake I used Frylight spray, & homemade lining paste/cake goop is also good)
  • 2 lb Loaf tin (21½ x 10cm / 8½ x 4 inch Bread Pan)
  • Sieve
  • Medium bowl x 2
  • Metal Spoon
  • Timer or Phone Timer
  • Cooling rack
  • OVEN: 180°c/160°c Fan Oven/350°f/Gas Mark 4

Ingredients

  • 113 grams Butter, unsalted (4 oz, 1 stick or ½ cup)
  • 150 grams Golden Syrup (5¼ oz or ⅓ cup)* see notes & before recipe
  • 75 grams Black Treacle (2½ oz, ¼ cup or 3 ¾ tbsp)
  • 113 grams Light Brown Sugar (4 oz or ½ cup)
  • 1 tsp Ground Ginger
  • tsp Ground Cinnamon
  • 188 ml Milk (1 fl oz or ¾ cup)
  • 2 Medium – Large Eggs (Large-XLarge size US)
  • tsp Bicarbonate of Soda (Baking Soda)
  • 225 grams Self-raising Flour (8 oz, 1 ¾ cups)
  • OR 1 ¾ cup Plain/All Purpose Flour plus 2 ¾ tsp Baking Powder (be sure to also add the Bicarb/Baking Soda above too)

For Icing/Glaze (optional)

  • 125 grams Icing/Powdered or Confectioners’ Sugar, sieved (4½ oz or 1 cup)
  • Few tsp Water or milk
  • Crystallised Stem Ginger Pieces, chopped (optional)

Instructions

  • Add butter, golden syrup, black treacle, sugar, cinnamon & ginger to a small saucepan, warm on medium heat till dissolved & melted. ** Tip for using the syrup, treacle or molasses – spray oil on measuring spoon first & it will slip off easier. See Photo 1 from using Frylight cooking spray. Mix everything thoroughly before removing from the heat & placing to the side to cool.
    $ photo collage of greasing spoon for syrup and treacle, adding to butter and fater heating - photo 1.
  • Grease & paper line your cake tin. See Photo 2 for how to use less paper, & fit better in the tin. Grease in place with butter, lining paste, or cooking/baking spray such as Frylight.
  • Heat the oven to 180°c/160°c Fan Oven/350°f/Gas Mark 4.
    4 photo collage of greasing and paper lining a rectangular bread loaf tin - photo 2.
  • Next add the eggs to a medium mixing bowl & whisk lightly to activate the protein & help provide structure for the cake. Add the milk & bicarbonate of soda (baking soda), whisking till all incorporated.
  • Add the cooled syrup mixture to this milky-egg mixture, stirring continually until all combined.
  • Lastly sieve the flour (& baking powder if using Plain/All Purpose Flour), over the mixture. Beat until combined & the batter is relatively smooth (few small lumps is fine) Use a hand-held or stand mixer for this if you like. Note batter will be thin & runny. See Photo 3.
  • Pour the cake batter into the prepared cake tin, & tap the tin on the counter/worktop a few times to expel any trapped air.
    2 photo collage of adding gingerbread cake batter to bread tin and after baking - photo 3.
  • Bake in the centre of the oven, for about 25 – 30 minutes, until set, a deep golden colour, & a wooden cocktail stick comes out clean of crumbs. *If top is colouring too soon, cover in foil till cooked through. (Check & cover if needed, at some point after 15 minutes of baking.) See Photo 3 above.
  • Leave the cake in the tin, placed on a cooling rack for about 10 minutes. Then transfer the cake, paper & all, directly on to the cooling rack, & allow to cool.

Make The Icing/Glaze

  • While the cake is cooling, make the icing/glaze if you are using. First sieve the icing/powdered sugar into a medium sized bowl.
  • Add 1 tsp of water (or milk) to begin with, & mix with a spoon. Making by hand, use the back of a large spoon to push down on the sugar that will keep absorbing the liquid. Gradually add a ½ tsp of water at a time till it becomes paste-like. (See photos before recipe for reference). Then add ⅛ tsp more at a time, until you get a thick but pourable icing/glaze. Watch my quick 10 second video showing how the glaze will fall. * If using a mixer, start by adding in 1½ tsp & again very gradually adding more drops.
  • Leave the cake on the paper baked with, still on top of the cooling rack, & place some more paper underneath, to catch any drips. Alternatively, transfer the cake to a platter with 2 pieces of paper underneath, that can be pulled & removed once the glaze is set.
    Extra extra close shot of top of a gingerbread cake with icing and pieces of crystallised stem ginger.
  • Drizzle the glaze over the cooled cake in any pattern you like or pour over & spread quickly before it sets. Add some chopped crystallised ginger if using & let the glaze set (dry to touch). Slice the cake with a large serrated knife & enjoy.

Storing & Freezing

  • Store in an airtight container or cake stand & dome, for at least a few days. (I use cake tins for most of my bakes).
  • Can be frozen – include kitchen paper/paper towel with it, that will absorb any moisture when defrosting. Wrap in baking/parchment paper, then cling film/plastic wrap or a food bag on top. Date and label the bag – will be good for a few months. Thaw at room temperature. Can be frozen with or without glaze.
    Overhead shot of a white glazed large gingerbread cake on a whit eplatter, on a white table for serving.

Video

Notes

**Toggle the photos or notes, on or off, when opting to print this recipe card
Black Treacle, Golden Syrup & Corn Syrup Debate  –  You can read more about the Black Treacle & Golden Syrup, before the recipe card.  As well as an experiment & why it tastes not as good with substitutes such as light & dark corn syrup.  I also included where you can buy these British products if you are in Canada or the US.  Lyles brand of Golden Syrup is not essential (other brands are available), & you can use black strap molasses instead of Black Treacle. 
Any milk is fine & dark brown sugar or coconut sugar would also work.
Close photo of a slice of gingerbread cake served & showing texture.
If using Plain (All Purpose) flour instead of UK Self-raising, (don’t get confused with US self-rising that has less baking powder – read more about Differences between US & UK Baking Ingredients), make sure you add the baking powder, as well as the bicarbonate of soda (baking soda).
Glazing Day After You can leave the baked cake in the tin for longer or overnight if not decorating or eating same day. Leave out at room temperature to cool completely, then wrap in cling film/plastic wrap. Don’t place in the fridge, as condensation will occur & wet the cake. 
Mini gingerbread bundt cake close up served, and with a very light glaze drizzled on top, with holly shaped and gingerbread men 3d sprinkles.
Variations On The Recipe 
See my slightly different recipe for making 12 mini gingerbread bundt cakes above, which can also be used to make 6 cakelets (see below).
Photo on black slate of small gingerbread cakelets in shape of snowflakes, with piped glazed to show details form cake pan.
For more information of process photos, please see before this recipe card.
More cakes on my Cake Recipes Page, or try my Christmas Recipes Page
Get some ideas & recipes for Food Gifting your homemade treats.
Fan of GBBO (Great British Baking Show)?  Learn more about differences in UK & US baking ingredients, or view, save & print my common baking ingredients conversion table. Includes gram, ounce & cup measurments. (Note all are hand measured by myself during recipe development & testing).
Occasionally I accept new members to Facebook group ‘Great British Bake Off Fans’.  Or join my Facebook group ‘Easy Online Baking Lessons’ to accompany this lesson website. 
_____________________________________________________________________________
 
**Nutritional Values – I am not a qualified nutritionist, so values are approximate based on cutting 12 slices (approx. 46g/1.6 oz), & values from sites such as Whisk.com, freecaloriechart.uk, information on ingredient packets & other sources. Note all values are not always available.  1 serving is 1 slice with glaze. (Unglazed  Calories 246, Carbs 37.25g, Sugars 23.13g)**
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Nutrition

Serving: 1Slice | Calories: 282kcal | Carbohydrates: 46g | Protein: 3.4g | Fat: 9g | Sugar: 31.9g
Sliced and glazed gingerbread cake loaf, with Christmas decorations on top.

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Caroline’s Easy Baking Lessons
Easy Gingerbread Cake – Sweet Lesson No.3
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One thought on “Easy Gingerbread Cake

  1. (5/5)

    5 stars
    Love gingerbread especially old fashioned gingerbread. This sounds great and going to try this week and maybe give out at Christmas to spend less on unwanted gifts this year. Thanks again

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